Millage F.A.Q.

Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q.) about the Millage Renewal

  1. What is this “Millage Renewal” all about?
  2. Why do we have to renew the millage?
  3. How long will the millage remain in effect if renewed?
  4. How does the millage impact the school’s funding?
  5. Is this a bond? What does this millage renewal have to do with the recent bond attempts?
  6. Will my taxes go up because of the millage renewal?
  7. What kinds of new programs and facility improvement will be realized due to the millage renewal?
  8. Has the district made any effort to lower costs, so that the millage is not required?
  9. What would happen if the millage is not renewed at the May 7, 2013, election?

Q1. What is this “Millage Renewal” all about?

A1. At a special election set for Tuesday, May 7, 2013 voters will be asked to approve:

  • A renewal of the 18 mill property tax on business, industrial and second home properties (“non-homestead”)
  • A 16.5354 millage (“hold-harmless”) renewal on their primary home.

This is merely a renewal of exist school funding levels.  It is NOT a new tax or a bond initiative.  This renewal maintains funds that make up approximately 25% of the district’s operating budget.

Q2. Why do we have to renew the millage?

A2. Voters last approved both millages in 2004 and are both subject to periodic renewal.   The millage runs for 10 years before renewal is necessary.

Q3. How long will the millage remain in effect if renewed?

A3. If the millages are approved on May 7, they would remain in effect for another ten years, or in this case, until 2024.

Q4. How does the millage impact the school’s funding?

  • The 18 mill “non-homestead” millage generates approximately $3.3 million, which is about 11 percent of the district’s general fund budget.  The non-homestead millage affects only commercial property, rentals and second homesteads.  It does not include a family’s primary residence.
  • The hold-harmless supplemental millage generates approximately $4 million which is about 14 percent of the general fund budget.
  • Both millages combined are approximately $7.3 million which is approximately about 25% of our revenue.  The school district would lose that level of funding for the 2014-15 school year and going forward if they are not renewed.

Q5. Is this a bond? What does this millage renewal have to do with the recent bond attempts?

A5. Nothing.  The millage has nothing to do with bond attempts in 2011 and 2012.  The millage is a renewal of existing school district funding.  Nothing more, nothing less.

Q6. Will I receive a new tax because of the millage renewal?

A6. No.  The millage is a renewal of existing school district funding that has been in place for 20 years (and renewed once before in 2004).  Because this is a renewal, there will be no new taxes on your tax bill.

Q7. What kinds of new programs and facility improvement will be realized due to the millage renewal?

A7. Unfortunately, NONE.  This a renewal of funding, not an increase.  Renewing the millage allows the district to maintain classes, programs, infrastructure, and operations.  It it does not provide any funding to make major improvements.  Even with the current millage funding, the district has been forced to be very creative to maintain operations and make improvements.  For a quick look at some of these improvements, please refer to the CLPS Innovator newsletters for Winter 2013 and Spring 2013.

Q8. Has the district made any effort to lower costs, so that the millage is not required?

A8. Yes.  To make necessary improvements, we have sought out special grants and funding programs.  The district has started programs such as “Academy 21”, and started leasing space to “Rising Stars” academy.  These programs bring much needed revenue into the district and allow us to make improvements across ALL schools.   We have also received major concessions from our bargaining groups, including teachers, that will help relieve government funding reductions.  It should be noted that state and federal funding have decreased for several years (almost a decade now), and that makes it difficult for school districts to maintain operating costs and keep a consistent budget.

For a quick look at some of these improvements the district has accomplished and some of more recent budget efforts, please refer to the CLPS Innovator newsletters for Winter 2013 and Spring 2013.

Q9. What would happen if the millage is not renewed at the May 7, 2013, election?

A9. The district has already been running in deficit for several years.  Even with innovative grant programs, new revenue streams from educational academies, and concessions from staff, it has still not been enough to pull the district out of deficit.  Now, imagine if the funding that is available was cut by 25%.    We do not know exactly what would happen if the millage is not renewed.  Failure to collect the funds locally that the millage generates would reduce the district’s General Fund revenue by 25% as it is not made up by any other sources.  Renewal would allow Center Line Public Schools to keep our quality programs intact.  Failure to renew would most likely see a major reduction in educational programs.

For a quick look at some of the improvements the district has accomplished and some of budget efforts to keep financially stable, please refer to the CLPS Innovator newsletters for Winter 2013 and Spring 2013.


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Continue on to “A Short Video About the Millage Renewal
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